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Service delivery indicators and monitoring to improve sustainability of rural water supplies

Current approaches to monitoring rural water supply often focus on coverage—measured in terms of numbers of systems built and people served. But the reality is that many systems break down within a few years of installation due to lack of proper support for operations and maintenance and people who were counted as served are left without a reliable service. How to prevent this widespread problem? One of the first steps is a monitoring system that is able to track the level of service over time and the performance of key technical, financial, and management functions so that problems can be anticipated and addressed. Good monitoring systems feed into local level planning and decision-making. They are realistically designed with existing resource constraints in mind and do not rely on short-term project funding.

TitleService delivery indicators and monitoring to improve sustainability of rural water supplies
Publication TypeBriefing Note
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsLockwood, H., Le Gouais, A.
Secondary TitleBriefing note. Building blocks for sustainability series
Pagination8 p.; 4 tab.; 2 fig.
Date Published10/2014
PublisherIRC
Place PublishedThe Hague, the Netherlands
Publication LanguageEnglish
Keywordscommunity management, monitoring, rural supply systems, service delivery, Triple-S (Sustainable Services at Scale), water quality monitoring, water supply services
Abstract

Current approaches to monitoring rural water supply often focus on coverage—measured in terms of numbers of systems built and people served. But the reality is that many systems break down within a few years of installation due to lack of proper support for operations and maintenance and people who were counted as served are left without a reliable service. How to prevent this widespread problem? One of the first steps is a monitoring system that is able to track the level of service over time and the performance of key technical, financial, and management functions so that problems can be anticipated and addressed. Good monitoring systems feed into local level planning and decision-making. They are realistically designed with existing resource constraints in mind and do not rely on short-term project funding.

Notes

References on p. 8

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Reprint Edition10/2014
Citation Key72566

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